When showing the love of God, the eyes have it

Print Article

Rev. Walter Klockers

“One day Peter and John were going up to the temple at the hour of prayer, at three o’clock in the afternoon. And a man lame from birth was being carried in. People would lay him daily at the gate of the temple called the Beautiful Gate so that he could ask for alms from those entering the temple. When he saw Peter and John about to go into the temple, he asked them for alms. Peter looked intently at him, as did John, and said, ‘Look at us.’ And he fixed his attention on them, expecting to receive something from them. But Peter said, ‘I have no silver or gold, but what I have I give you; in the name of Jesus Christ of Nazareth, stand up and walk,’” reads Acts 3: 1-5.

In the New Testament, within the four Gospels and the book of Acts, there are a wealth of healing stories. It is easy to praise the miracles themselves.

However, there is often more to see. For example, in the above reading, Peter heals a man crippled from birth. In their exchange, the emphasis upon eye contact is important to note. It was likely that this man cast his gaze downward. Having his pleas mostly ignored, with a constant stream of rejection, by a multitude of people looking past him, was discouraging.

Peter and John’s encounter was much different. Peter insisted on eye contact. What did this do? It gave the man dignity. It was a direct sign that he was valued as a fellow human being. It was also a way of emphasizing the words that were spoken to him, which included the source of the healing — Jesus.

We might remember this when we encounter someone panhandling for money. We may not feel called to help him or her in this way. However, if we are able, dignifying the other by making eye contact is important, as challenging as this may be.

Walter is pastor of Immanuel Lutheran Church and has served as parish pastor for 30 years.

Print Article

Read More Religion

Light bulbs are not always reliable

December 07, 2018 at 5:00 am | Columbia Basin Herald Yes, it is that time of year again. A short while ago, I went into the basement and unboxed our artificial Christmas tree. We purchased it back in December of 2016. The tree originally came with th...

Comments

Read More

Repeatedly losing and finding Nemo

November 30, 2018 at 5:00 am | Columbia Basin Herald Do you still have a Christmas gift that was given to you years ago? I have one that I’ve hung onto since 2003. That was the year that the movie “Finding Nemo” was shown in theaters. The central cha...

Comments

Read More

Understanding the disciples and self-awareness

November 23, 2018 at 5:00 am | Columbia Basin Herald It is easy to look back at Jesus’ disciples and judge them harshly. Save one (Judas), they seem to be well-meaning. However, they still usually end up missing the mark. Chief among them was Peter. ...

Comments

Read More

The surprising gift of multiplicity

November 16, 2018 at 5:00 am | Columbia Basin Herald Cynthia G. Lindner is part of the faculty of the University of Chicago Divinity School. Rev. Lindner is also a pastoral psychotherapist at the Center for Religion and Psychotherapy. In addition, she ...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

(509) 765-4561
PO Box 910
Moses Lake, WA 98837

©2018 Columbia Basin Herald Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X