Letters to the Editor for the week of July 8-12

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“Walmart security to the rescue”

I want us all to appreciate Walmart’s sophisticated security system.

I recently distractedly left without my $20 cash back. Walmart efficiently reviewed their tapes and got it back to me.?

Now they saved that young babysitter’s income.

Yay for new technology and Walmart.

Jill Ford

Moses Lake

“Masquers Theater worth checking out”

During these times of division and stress in our country, city/county/state and federal, I would like to add a little on the positive side.

Recently, a friend and I went to Soap Lake to the Masquers Theater to a play, performed by our own local talent from various areas of the Basin. This time they had done their rendition of “Arsenic and Old Lace” and it was just the best afternoon I have spent in a long while. I highly recommend a visit to the next play they put on at the Masquers. Just an elegant little theater and so well managed, and oh my, the talent is just outstanding. Do yourself a favor and give it a try in the near future. You will not be disappointed.

Donna Kasten

Moses Lake

“Williams departure leaves questions”

It sounds like everyone’s happy except perhaps the seven employees who alleged sexual misconduct against Mr. Williams. Have they, too, agreed not to pursue further actions in exchange for some settlement?

Susan Blackwell

Moses Lake

“Global warming”

We are told by the scientific community that the world average temperature has increased one degree Celsius over the last 100 years. In other words, the increase has been so minute that it is not something we could perceive except with instruments. We are told by the majority of scientists that the increased temperature has been caused by CO2 emissions. That conclusion requires that all other potential causes have been eliminated. Have all other possible causes been eliminated? The same scientific community says there have been dramatic shifts in world temperature in the distant past. We are told that the canyons and gorges in the Columbia Basin were caused by melting glaciers. Clearly there have been huge shifts in temperature in the past that had nothing to do with fuels.

There are those in our country who want to eliminate carbon fuels. Governor Inslee wants to impose a carbon tax sufficient to substantially shift public use away from carbon fuels. OK, to what fuel? There is no other fuel. Assuming that many more dams were built and batteries were improved so that we could use electricity, the expense would be substantial. It would be equivalent to reducing a family wage by 20 to 40 percent depending on the cost. But of course, there are not enough rivers. Even if we plastered the countryside with windmills and solar panels, it would not begin to be enough, and the batteries would have to be infinitely better.

If politicians are really serious about the danger of carbon fuels there is at least a partial solution, and it is fairly obvious. We know that plant life depends on carbon dioxide. Without carbon dioxide all plant life would die and then all animal life, including us. In fact, if more carbon dioxide is available to plants, they will use more. Greenhouse owners actually pump carbon dioxide into their greenhouses because the plants use up the carbon dioxide in the air.

Here is a possible solution: The Columbia Basin project is only half completed. The Wahluke Slope already has the water available. Why is it not being farmed? The same people who want to impose a carbon tax are the same people who designated that choice farmland on Wahluke Slope to be a park for coyotes and other desert animals. These same people want to take out the dams on the Snake River.

Both political parties should be in favor of farming all of Wahluke Slope and there is no reason it cannot be done immediately by a simple vote on a bill to remove the lands from parks and make it available for farming.

Ken Jorgensen

Moses Lake

“I named her Heidi”

On a cold and snowy Saturday morning in December of 2008, I called my sister and convinced her to go with me to look at a female Golden Retriever mix dog named Rosie at the Grant County Animal Outreach Shelter in Moses Lake, Washington. My sister and I were from Ellensburg so we headed east later that day on I—90 to see this dog named Rosie. I noticed that she has been at this shelter for several weeks and I had called there previously two times to inquire about her. Yes, they still had her. Once my sister and I saw her my sister said to me “Let’s get her and go.” We drove back to Ellensburg on a very dark and snowy and icy I-90. I—90 was extremely icy that night.

Rosie’s name was soon changed to Heidi and two months later I got another Golden Retriever which I named Neisha. Neisha was a very active 12-week-old puppy and she loved playing with Heidi. The years up to last week were filled with love and happy memories. I later found out Heidi had been a stray that had wandered onto a farm in or near Marlin or Krupp, Washington. The people who brought Heidi to the shelter had her for about a month and could not keep her. The train passed through their property and they were concerned for the safety of their own dog and Heidi. Heidi loved to wander and explore. They understandably did not want their own dog or Heidi to be hit by a train.

I was going through a divorce when I got Heidi and rather than me rescuing Heidi, she rescued me. I had originally wanted a puppy; instead Heidi caught my eye after viewing many dogs on petfinder.com. No one knows her exact age, but I do know she did not like men as she hid or cowered when meeting them. She never bit them. My guess is she was dumped in or near Marlin or had wandered from a place she did not like.

Heidi survived cancer two times. She had breast cancer in 2010 and had a lump removed on her leg that was cancer a few years ago. Heidi’s hips and back legs were in very bad shape and she began to not eat as much for the last few months. One day last week I had to make the decision of not seeing her suffer any more. She had lost a lot of weight and not eating. I had many happy memories of Heidi. I know that God has a special place in heaven for her.

Please give an animal shelter or a rescue a chance before looking anywhere for a dog. There’s a puppy or a mature dog out there who would love to be rescued and to be given a second chance. I miss her more than words can express. Heidi is survived by Neisha and her little brother Tanner who is a Shih Tzu and who also is a rescue and my husband and I.

Lannett Ingraham

Lakewood, Washington

“A public thank you to Grant PUD, Microsoft”

Here I am checking my mail from The White House, Dept. of Ecology on behalf of the Governor’s Office, and a sweet thank you for volunteering for the Presbyterian Church’s VBS, when I realized I haven’t sent a public thank you to the PUD and Microsoft for their contributions to Grant County needs.

With sincere gratitude and appreciation, I would like to publicly give thanks to the PUD and Microsoft for their recent $480,000 donation from the energy conservation rebate. Thank you PUD for evolving the “Pay It Forward” program from Initiative 937 and working with eligible clients to generate and produce monetary rebates. Thank you Microsoft for your leadership and generosity to defer taking the rebate and instead donate the money to the “Pay It Forward” program, which is designed to specifically benefit Grant County residents.

I would also like to say thank you to everyone who was at the PUD meeting on June 11, 2019; because it was nice to be treated with kindness, smiles, laughter, jokes and thanks. I am excited for the progress our PUD has been committed to ensuring and are exhibiting. I appreciate the professionalism and fun. I am looking forward to working with and giving suggestions to the PUD on where community needs are noticed for future rebates. It is nice to be in an environment where my opinion is valued and everyone is kind.

It is my hope that any company, business or person who is working with the PUD to save energy and are eligible for rebates will follow suit with Microsoft and defer taking the rebate and donate the money to the “Pay It Forward” program. One, because energy saving is good for our world. And two, because having the means to defer rebates to community needs is so super nice and cool. Please and thank you.

Elisia Dalluge

Moses Lake

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