Leviathans come in all sizes

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  • Rev. Walter Klockers

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    Walter Klockers/courtesy photo A thin-legged wolf spider graces a rock edge.

  • Rev. Walter Klockers

  • 1

    Walter Klockers/courtesy photo A thin-legged wolf spider graces a rock edge.

“There go the ships, and Leviathan that you formed to sport in it.”

Ever since I was a young boy, I wondered about the Biblical “Leviathan” in Psalm 104:26.

You can find the word in the Old Testament books of Job, Psalms and Isaiah.

To me, in some in—stances, it can be understood metaphorically, as one of the mighty enemies of the Hebrew people like the Babylonians.

In other verses, the word was possibly used to describe any “sea monster” that might have lived in the dark, murky depths.

Such creatures were shrouded in mystery; what was generally unknown at that time was feared.

Education can be the key to overcoming these fears. It took brave and adventurous pioneers to make this a reality. Over the centuries, these people explored, discovered, learned and taught the world about many “Leviathans.”

Today, as a result, whale watching tours are quite popular off of our shores.

In our present age, I believe that there is far less mystery about large creatures as there is about smaller ones. This can be on land or sea.

In case we haven’t met, I am pastor of Immanuel Lutheran Church, which is right across the street from McCosh Park. Whenever I get a little free time I engage in a hobby of mine. It is macrophotography, which is taking photographs of very small creatures.

Recently, I took my camera over to the park. I sat down on a large rock by the water, placed each of my feet on stones to brace myself, turned my torso to the left, and looked at a small creature through the lens of my camera. I blazed the flash several times when a young woman slowly and cautiously approached me. She kept on saying, “are you all right?” To which I replied, “yes, I’m just fine, thank you.”

I eventually took my eyes off of the subject, met her gaze, and explained what I was doing. She seemed satisfied with that information and was relieved that I was OK.

I went back to patiently coaxing the curious 1/4-inch-long thin-legged wolf spider out into the open. She obliged and I took more photographs.

I use photos like these when I give “bug presentations” in the local schools. I teach the children that not all small creatures are to be feared.

The world needs far fewer Leviathans.

Walter is pastor of Immanuel Lutheran Church and has served as parish pastor for more than 25 years.

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