Be mindful that what goes around comes around

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Rev. Walter Klockers

Jeanne and I have enjoyed dining at many restaurants in Moses Lake.

One evening, a few weeks back, I suggested we order takeout food from one of them. We decided upon a place that wasn’t too far away. My wife ordered our meals online. She then told me the price, order number, and pick up time.

A few minutes later, I put on my snake-proof boots, hat, coat, gloves, and headed for the door. Just before I exited, I asked my wife if she would be willing to also text the information to me, just in case my memory failed. She was so kind to do this for me.

A fair amount of snow and patches of ice covered the pavement that day. It wasn’t enough to keep me from fetching dinner, however.

After I parked the car, I found the walk to the front door of the restaurant a bit treacherous. Each step required an extra dose of concentration. I was thankful that I remained upright. I entered the restaurant, approached the counter, and gave the young man who greeted me the memorized passwords: Jeanne’s name, order number, and purchase price. I have to admit that I was proud that I had recalled it all.

The man dutifully attempted to track down the food, but to my dismay, found no record of this order. So, I repeated the information. He rechecked – still no such order. The man then turned to his co-workers but they all shook their heads negatively.

So, I pulled out my iPhone and showed him Jeanne’s text message. After reading the words, he looked up at me and said … “Sir, this is not Sumo. You are at J’s Teriyaki Grill.”

I was at the wrong restaurant. How embarrassing is that?

A few days ago, on a weekday afternoon, someone showed up at the church just as I was exiting. I warmly greeted him. The young man said he was looking for someone and had a package to deliver. I had never heard of the name he mentioned. Turns out, the address was correct, except for the street.

I told him not to worry or be embarrassed. I could certainly relate.

Ephesians 4:32 says “…be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ has forgiven you.”

The habit of putting yourself in the other person’s shoes is good policy.

Walter is pastor of Immanuel Lutheran Church and has served as parish pastor for more than 25 years.

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